Skip to main content

Take a sad song and make it better

We know that listening to music and exercise has positive effects on our wellbeing.  If this is so, then putting the two together should have added benefits.  You might think that is so, and you would be right. But what is the evidence that it does? 

We know that 'sad music' makes us...well...feel sad.  That is why it is called sad. Precisely what it is that makes us feel sad when listening to it is an interesting question.  Music in minor keys tends to sound 'sadder' or more melancholy than tunes in major keys.  We can bring about a major change in mood simply by switching from major to minor, and this is commonly exploited in popular and classical music.  It can introduce a kind of melancholy even within an otherwise jolly and uplifting piece.  When I listen to Let it Be, I find it both uplifting and with that important ingredient,  a tinge of melancholy. 

Certainly, the lyrics are important.  When I find my self in times of trouble, mother Mary comes to me, speaking words of wisdom, let it be.  That isn't sad at all.  It is uplifting. It makes us feel good. Then there is the tempo and so on.  Let's face it, fast music tends to be jolly.  It is the creative genius of Paul McCartney.  Let it be, lifts us up.   But my point isn't to analyse the music so much as to see that it feeds into something deep, culturally and spiritually, and also physiologically.  This is why it is so important in our health and wellbeing.  I often feel that while Dylan was the voice of a generation, the Beatles were the mood. I've got a good reason for taking the easy way out. All we are saying is 'give peace a chance'. 

While exercising and listening to music both have known positive effects on our wellbeing, there has been limited research on the psychological impact of doing both activities simultaneously. A new article published in Neuroscience has reviewed these effects in 33 young adults, who participated in a moderate-intensity pedalling exercise, on three separate occasions under varied conditions: without music; listening to their favourite music, and listening to a steady control beep.

Participants were then assessed on the state of their psychological mood and cognitive ability following the activity. The results indicate that listening to music while exercising elicited a more significant self-reported enhancement of positive mood, which in turn positively impacted cognitive performance, compared to work-outs without music.

Now I hear you saying "I could have told you that!" You could, and you could also give it tune and make it a song.  Hey Jude, don't make it bad, take a sad song and make it better. 
 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Prioritising people in nursing care.

There has been in recent years concern that care in the NHS has not been sufficiently 'patient centred', or responsive to the needs of the patient on a case basis. It has been felt in care that it as been the patient who has had to adapt to the regime of care, rather than the other way around. Putting patients at the centre of care means being responsive to their needs and supporting them through the process of health care delivery.  Patients should not become identikit sausages in a production line. The nurses body, the Nursing and Midwifery Council has responded to this challenge with a revised code of practice reflection get changes in health and social care since the previous code was published in 2008. The Code describes the professional standards of practice and behaviour for nurses and midwives. Four themes describe what nurses and midwives are expected to do: prioritise people practise effectively preserve safety, and promote professionalism and trust. The

The internet trails of Ants

Ants share, and they are built to do just that.  They walk and talk to cooperate in all they do.  Ants have two stomachs, with the second one set aside for storing food to be shared with other ants.  Ants get pretty intimate when meeting each other.  The ants kiss, but this kiss isn't any ordinary kind of kiss. Instead, they regurgitate food and exchange it with one another.  By sharing saliva and food,  ants communicate.  Each ant colony has a unique smell, so members recognize each other and sniff out intruders. In addition, all ants can produce pheromones, which are scent chemicals used for communication and to make trails. Ants are problem solvers.  We may recall the problems puzzles we were given as children. We look to see if the pieces will fit.  Jiz saw puzzles are much the same but with many contextual factors. First, the picture tells a story. Then, once we know what the image might be, it becomes easier to see which pieces to look for.  Ants lay down trails. Just as we f

The Thin End account of COVID Lockdown