Skip to main content

Prioritising people in nursing care.


There has been in recent years concern that care in the NHS has not been sufficiently 'patient centred', or responsive to the needs of the patient on a case basis. It has been felt in care that it as been the patient who has had to adapt to the regime of care, rather than the other way around. Putting patients at the centre of care means being responsive to their needs and supporting them through the process of health care delivery.  Patients should not become identikit sausages in a production line.

The nurses body, the Nursing and Midwifery Council has responded to this challenge with a revised code of practice reflection get changes in health and social care since the previous code was published in 2008.

The Code describes the professional standards of practice and behaviour for nurses and midwives. Four themes describe what nurses and midwives are expected to do:

prioritise people
practise effectively
preserve safety, and
promote professionalism and trust.

The revised Code  reflects the changes in health and social care since the previous code was issued in 2008 with new requirements on:

Fundamentals of care: This covers the essential aspects of caring for a patient, including making sure that a patient has adequate access to nutrition and hydration.

The duty of candour: Nurses and midwives should be open and honest with colleagues, patients and healthcare regulators when things go wrong.

Raising concerns: Nurses and midwives should raise concerns without delay if they are aware of a threat to patient safety or public protection.

Delegation and accountability: Nurses and midwives should make sure that they delegate tasks and duties appropriately and those they delegate to complete tasks to the required standard.

The professional duty to take action in an emergency: Nurses and midwives should take action in an emergency when off-duty, within the limits of their competence.

Social media use: Nurses and midwives should use social media responsibly, in line with our guidance.

The Code also makes clear that responsibility for those receiving care lies not only with the nurse or midwife providing hands-on care, but also with those nurses and midwives working in policy, education and management roles.

This new code is to be welcomed.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The internet trails of Ants

Ants share, and they are built to do just that.  They walk and talk to cooperate in all they do.  Ants have two stomachs, with the second one set aside for storing food to be shared with other ants.  Ants get pretty intimate when meeting each other.  The ants kiss, but this kiss isn't any ordinary kind of kiss. Instead, they regurgitate food and exchange it with one another.  By sharing saliva and food,  ants communicate.  Each ant colony has a unique smell, so members recognize each other and sniff out intruders. In addition, all ants can produce pheromones, which are scent chemicals used for communication and to make trails. Ants are problem solvers.  We may recall the problems puzzles we were given as children. We look to see if the pieces will fit.  Jiz saw puzzles are much the same but with many contextual factors. First, the picture tells a story. Then, once we know what the image might be, it becomes easier to see which pieces to look for.  Ants lay down trails. Just as we f

The Thin End account of COVID Lockdown