Sunday, 29 March 2015

The Tory ideological attack on the poorest

The majority of people on benefits in the UK are hard working and on low pay.  Many of them would be on the kind of zero hours contracts that the Prime Minister conceded, eventually,  in his interview with Jeremy Paxman that he would not like to be on.  He was also asked by Jeremy Paxman where the cuts would fall to deal with the deficit.  The answer of course is 'cutting benefits' and through further 'efficiency savings'.   It is all pie in the sky.  Either the Prime Minister has no idea how they would cut the deficit or the Tories have a hidden agenda.  Actually, it is not so hidden. They will cut 'welfare'.  That is what would happen - swingeing cuts in welfare.

Swingeing cuts in welfare will hurt the hard working poor.  The poorest are already paying disproportionately more tax than the wealthiest.  They have already suffered through measures such as the 'bedroom tax' and other cuts in benefit.

At the outset of the coalition five years ago, we were told we were 'all in this together'.  But it has been the poorest who have suffered the most because of the greed of the bankers. It was the banks who brought havoc and ruin to the global economy.  Now the poor are made to suffer.

It is no real secret that the Tories are planning further attacks on benefits.  They do so not simply to cut the deficit but through ideology.  But what really gives the lie to their claim to cut the deficit is tat at the same time as they plan this further assault on the poor, they are cutting taxes and providing further benefits for those who can afford to save.

This government slashed funding to local authorities by 40% which in turn meant a cut of 20% in funding for social care.  This is a major factor in the increased load on the NHS.  The Prime Minister now peddles reconditioned policy initiatives such as providing a 'seven day a week' NHS.  Most of my neighbours already thought the NHS was supposed to be 24/7.  Now they learn that it is not, but the Prime Minister will sweep down form high with new funds to make it so.  But they are not new funds. The NHS will have a funding gap of £30 bn by 2020.  It has already had £20 bn cuts in 'efficiency savings' and yet in his interview with Mr Paxman the Prime Minister believes it can find a further £30 bn over the next five years.  It doesn't add up.  It doesn't make sense.  It is, as the BMA, rightly point out 'playing games' with the NHS.


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