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Young Israelis shift to the right?

Hope for a better future for both the Palestinians and the Israelis appear have taken a knock with an analysis that shows young Israelis have shifted to the right, with 53.9% voting for right-wing parties. But is it the full story?

Seventy per cent of Jewish Israelis define themselves as right-wing. And less than 30% support a two-state solution.   For those hoping for a generation shift that would give impetus to a peaceful solution that recognised the rights of Palestinians, it gets worse.

Forty per cent of young Jewish Israelis according to the poll would support a complete annexation of the West Bank.   The poll shows little sympathy for the Palestinians.

Those of us who had hoped for a generation shift can take some comfort from the reasons given by young Israelis for their position.   Many more would support a two-state solution if security for Israel could be guaranteed.  Security is the primary concern of voters, young and old.  Hope also lies elsewhere in their thinking.

The 'two-state' solution isn't a solution.  It isn't because it doesn't exist as a reality.   It is as if the younger Israelis really want to rip the old peace process up and start again, perhaps by establishing new principles.  Drafting new pillars for peace might enable Israeli concerns about security to be addressed.   The peace process, in any event, is dead.

One of the respondents in the poll summed it up by saying


It’s more complicated than right, left and center. I don’t think it’s possible to really define these terms.

Indeed, that is true.  The problem isn't defined by a left-right positioning, and nor is the solution.  A solution can only come from reaching across the old political divide.  And there lies real hope for the future.

It is clear from the opinions of young Israelis that they are far more socially liberal and egalitarian. What is needed is a political process that can reflect their concerns.  
















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