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Signs of second wave of COVID-19 across Europe

The upsurge in COVID-19 cases in Spain serves as a timely reminder that we are not out of the woods. The UK government acted swiftly to impose a two week quarantine period for people arriving from Spain. The latest advice from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) states that travellers returning to England, Scotland, Wales, or Northern Ireland from anywhere in Spain after July 26 needed to self-isolate for 14 days.

It would be wrong to consider that the problem is a Spanish one. It isn't. As the Prime Minister acknowledges, there are signs of a second wave across Europe. We can hope that with speedy action it can be contained. Certainly,  we need to be vigilant and ready to act decisively in the UK. The test, track and treat are vital in ensuring a speedy and effective response.

The Thin End COVID lockdown diary is out now on Kindle.  "It became clear from the beginning of the COVID Pandemic that many countries were ill-prepared for the task. This was undoubtedly true of the United Kingdom- not only was the country poorly prepared, but the government was slow to act, had inconsistent messages, and failed to sort out the logistics of ensuring adequate supplies of personal protective equipment for key health and care workers. They were late to order a lockdown, which likely cost many lives. They ordered elderly patients to be discharged from hospitals to care homes without COVID testing, contributing to the high death toll in care homes. They failed to meet targets on testing and tracking. This sad story of dithering and delay is recorded in this diary."

 

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