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Brexit's ghostly presence

It is still said by many that this UK general election is about Brexit.  In many ways it is, and no doubt Brexit, remain or leave, will influence voters.  But it hardly features in the debate at a national level.

So far, Boris Johnson is not attempting to make a case for his 'deal', or for a possible no-deal exit.  On the contrary, he has been busy trying to cover up the Tories appalling record in government: failure on the environment, failure on pensions, failure on social care, failing children's services, and a crisis in the NHS and in our schools.

Some might argue that such matters are of less concern if the economy was doing well after a decade of austerity, but it isn't.  The Tories have failed on the economy and, if anything, are now abandoning caution to the wind in an attempt to woo voters.

"Brexit haunts the election like a ghost"

One thing is missing is Brexit.  It haunts the election like a ghost, but few if any are discussing the details of it.   Remain and Leave alike get cross over tactical voting.  They exist in their ever deeper trenches lobbing grenades about who is best situated to win this or that seat.

Boris appears to spend more time with infants in primary schools and other such set-pieces than he does spelling out his position on Brexit.   When he tried to make a case, he got it wrong.  He appeared not to understand the consequences of his own deal and the border with Ireland.

The entrenched position of Remain and Leave seem at the moment to be benefitting Boris Johnso's chances.  The polls suggest a big majority in the House of Commons.   Leave has coalesced around the Tories now that the Brexit Party have all but left the scene.  Nigel Farage snipes from the sidelines, but that is where he is - sidelined.

Meanwhile, the 'remain parties' snap at Labour's Achille's tendon.   They appear more concerned with that than putting the case against the Tories.

Corbyn still gets criticised for not having a clear position.  This is silly.  His position has been clear since 2016, which is that there should be a negotiated customs union.  What has changed is that this will be put to the people in a second referendum.   That is clear enough.  It is also reasonable and might help heal the country.

"Corbyn's position is clear: a deal with a customs union and a people's vote to decide."

What will not heal the country is the entrenched 'do or die' position of the Liberal Democrats.  it becomes difficult to know whether they want a people's vote or not.  I imagine not - as their position is 'clear', to revoke article 50.   It is a position that ignores the many millions who voted to leave the European Union.   Under the LibDems, they would simply be told that we are staying and that is that.

The LibDems can adopt such a cavalier and irresponsible position because they won't form a government.   Their mission is to increase their numbers of MPs.   This is why they have leaflets telling untruths to voters in various constituencies with made up polling figures to suggest they are best positioned to win against the incumbent Tory.   It is what it is - lies.  It is deceitful, and it is more likely to end up with a Boris Johnson Brexit than not.  So it is a completely disingenuous campaign.

So, we have Boris avoiding talking about his deal and Jo Swinson being deceitful.  The only party clearly offering a people's vote is led by Jeremy Corbyn, and if you want a people's vote that is who you should support.

Then we might be in a position to have a real election about Brexit: a referendum where any deal for leaving can be put to the scrutiny and test of the people.

Let the people decide.






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