Skip to main content

Johnson's forked tongue

If you listen to Boris Johnson speaking in the Republic of Ireland today you would think he was doing everything to avoid the 'failure' of a no-deal Brexit.   The UK Prime Minister now says a no-deal Brexit would be

 "a failure of statecraft for which we would all be responsible."


Yet, he still panders to the 'no-deal' lobby back home.  Those who always say 'leave means leave' or that they voted for no-deal.

Boris Johnson's position is disingenuous.  He has presented no new ideas for a deal, yet he says 'a deal can be found'.

Boris is deceiving the British people, which is why today he is proroguing parliament so he cannot be found out.

The 'failure of statecraft' has already been made.  It is made in the failure to address the very real issues arising from Brexit and our relationship with the EU moving forward.   It follows from the consequences of no-deal, with delays at ports leading to the insecurity of food supplies and medicines.   Boris Johnson knows the consequences of a no-deal Brexit because he has seen the assessments.  They are made in good faith by sector representatives.

The failure of statecraft is made in the cavalier brinkmanship the Prime Minister has adopted.  He has some faith that the EU will bow to his will.   The truth is very different.  The problems are real, and Boris has no answer for them.

Johnson speaks to the nation with a forked tongue.  He leads the hard Brexiters on in the quest for a 'clean break', no-deal exit from the EU.  Yet, he knows a deal is needed.  It is needed to deal with the Irish border problem.  It is needed for our continued trade with the EU.

This border problem is not invented.  It is key to the Good Friday agreement and the peace process.  The UK has a treaty with the Republic of Ireland to keep free movement across the border.  Boris Johnson knows this.

The failure of statecraft is Boris Johnson.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Prioritising people in nursing care.

There has been in recent years concern that care in the NHS has not been sufficiently 'patient centred', or responsive to the needs of the patient on a case basis. It has been felt in care that it as been the patient who has had to adapt to the regime of care, rather than the other way around. Putting patients at the centre of care means being responsive to their needs and supporting them through the process of health care delivery.  Patients should not become identikit sausages in a production line. The nurses body, the Nursing and Midwifery Council has responded to this challenge with a revised code of practice reflection get changes in health and social care since the previous code was published in 2008. The Code describes the professional standards of practice and behaviour for nurses and midwives. Four themes describe what nurses and midwives are expected to do: prioritise people practise effectively preserve safety, and promote professionalism and trust. The

The internet trails of Ants

Ants share, and they are built to do just that.  They walk and talk to cooperate in all they do.  Ants have two stomachs, with the second one set aside for storing food to be shared with other ants.  Ants get pretty intimate when meeting each other.  The ants kiss, but this kiss isn't any ordinary kind of kiss. Instead, they regurgitate food and exchange it with one another.  By sharing saliva and food,  ants communicate.  Each ant colony has a unique smell, so members recognize each other and sniff out intruders. In addition, all ants can produce pheromones, which are scent chemicals used for communication and to make trails. Ants are problem solvers.  We may recall the problems puzzles we were given as children. We look to see if the pieces will fit.  Jiz saw puzzles are much the same but with many contextual factors. First, the picture tells a story. Then, once we know what the image might be, it becomes easier to see which pieces to look for.  Ants lay down trails. Just as we f

The Thin End account of COVID Lockdown