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Will no-deal diminish Britain's standing in the world?

A group of ex-British ambassadors have warned Boris Johnson that a no-deal Brexit will diminish Britain's influence and standing in the world. 

Of course, it would, just as it was declining rapidly before we joined the EU. The UK will become tied to the apron strings of the USA, just as we now seek to curry favour with Trump for a trade deal.  Boris Johnson pleads with Trump to 'be nice'. 




Before joining the European Union, Britain was the 'sick man of Europe', with a declining economy and influence in the world.  Do we forget the endless balance of payments problems and sterling crises?  Do we forget running to the IMF for bailouts?  

We have played a more significant role as a member of the EU than we would have been able to do outside it.  This is why Britain is now still a member of the G7.  The EU has enabled the UK to punch above its weight.  Instead leaving the EU we should be looking for ways to make that weight count on environmental issues and global trade.  We need to lead Europe not retreat from it.  

This does not make the EU perfect. It isn't. But I remain unpersuaded by the reasons and motive for leaving.  Leaving is based on a vague promise of good things to come if we are 'free' from the 'shackles' of the European Union.  

If I could be persuaded that we would have a greater impact on environmental issues, on world peace, and on sustainability, freedom, justice, eradicating poverty, then I would support leaving the EU. But I see no such arguments. I see a distorted history, bigotry, nationalistic rhetoric, the potential break-up of the United Kingdom, and dangerous jingoistic nonsense.

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