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Will Farage's election deal with Johnson backfire?

Farage's deal with Boris, standing down to give the Tories a clear run in those seats they won in 2016, looks like a winning edge for Johnson, but it may backfire. 

Looking across the polls there does appear to have been a shift in support for Labour. Whether it is significant and consistent remains to be seen. If campaigns do anything, then it is not surprising Labour has picked up.

 The Tories have had a bad week. Johnson, far from meeting ‘real’ people and being seen out and about, has been cocooned with infants in schools or walking around aimlessly in hospital corridors – which didn’t do too well for him when confronted with patients and doctors angry about what the Tories have done to the NHS. 

Corbyn, on the other hand, has had a good start. As in 2017, the more the Tory press portray him as a bogeyman, the more voters see the contrast with the man out on the stumps. He seems to have an edge with empathy, which for all his populism Boris Johnson appears to lack.

Little wonder t…

Allow Boris to compromise but let's vote

Boris it appears is about to compromise on the backstop to do a deal on Brexit.  Such a compromise is good and should be encouraged because leaving the EU without a deal would be catastrophic, and, despite his rhetoric, Boris Johnson knows that to be so.  But an agreement must be put back to the people to decide.

Accounts running in the press today suggest he is willing to reproduce Mrs May's former compromise on a Northern Ireland customs union with the EU.

This is a deal Brexiteers, such as Rees Mogg,  described as

“completely cretinous, impractical, bureaucratic and a betrayal of common sense.”

But let's not stop Boris compromising.  It is far better for the country that a deal is done.  But such an agreement must be put back to the people.

A deal put forward by those in government who once described it as cretinous, impractical, bureaucratic and a betrayal of common sense needs to be approved by the people.

Is it really what people thought would happen when they voted to Leave in 2016?

Just a few months ago Boris Johnson and the  Leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees Mogg said it was not.

It is also becoming clear that the details of the proposal will need time to pin down.  Rushing through a deal simply to hit the 31st October deadline would be foolish.

Both parliament and the British people need time to scrutinise the detail of any deal.

Parliament must insist that the Brexit deadline now be extended to give sufficient time for the deal to be adequately negotiated and for that deal to be put to a fresh referendum.





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