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Why oh why Mr Johnson?

Mr Johnson:
If the NHS means so much to you, why has the Tory government starved if of the funds needed to meet demand?
If health matters then why have you cut funding for public health over the last decade?
If children's education matters, then why have you let schools crumble?
If social care matters, then why have you not funded it?
If children's services matter, then why have you cut them?
If local democracy matters, then why have you starved local authorities of the funds needed for their statutory duties?
If you want to close the gap of inequality, then why has child poverty increased?
Why is pensioner poverty increasing?
Why are so many families having to depend on food banks?
Why is growth sluggish after a decade of Tory management of the economy?
Why is the United Kingdom at risk of breaking apart?
Why oh why Mr Johnson?

Massive regional variation in unemployment

The labour market statistics published today by the Office for National Statistics continue to show the massive regional variation that has become a familiar feature of this recession.

As the UK climbs out of recession the benefit in terms of jobs is largely experienced in the South East. The disparity between the South East and the rest of the country grows. Unemployment is almost twice as high in the North East.

The unemployment rate in Great Britain was highest in the North East (10.3%) and lowest in the Sout East of England (5.9%).

The Claimant Count rate in Great Britain was highest in the North East (6.5%) and lowest in the South East (2.4%).

Another familiar feature is the large numbers working part-time or with temporary employment. 

The increase in employment is welcome news and another indication that the UK is edging out of recession. But there is a caveat, and it is again the regional disparity. The increased employment is largely in the South East. And there is a regional  disparity in the unemployment rate. Unemployment in the North West increased. Unemployment in the North East and the Midlands remains high with little change. Economic activity in these regions has not picked up and growth is patchy.

The feel good factor isn't yet reaching most parts of the United Kingdom, as these figures represent a growing national divide in potential opportunities and  living standards.

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