Boris fails to show

Boris Johnson is running from an interview with Andrew Neil on BBC.  He also strangely avoided an interview on Channel 4, the climate debate, and is also declining interviews on ITV.

The truth is, we are not seeing that much of Boris Johnson.  He prefers the set-piece photo opportunity, spending more time talking to infants than to voters.   On several occasions when he has met voters, they have taken him to task over the Tory record in government.

It is little wonder he is avoiding debate.

In Andrew Neil's interview with Nigel Farage, the point was rightly made by Farage that Boris Johnson's Brexit 'deal' was not being debated in the election.  Indeed, although Boris likes the slogan 'getting Brexit done', he avoids talking about his deal.

There are good reasons for this.  It is a bad deal.  He knows it, and Farage tells him it is.  It is a bad deal whether you want to remain in the EU or leave it.   It is yet another issue about which Boris Johnson would wish to avoid scrutiny, particularly from the forensic master, Andrew Neil.

So Johnson is running scared and he fails to show.  A sheep in a field has got more chance of getting answers from him, than any political journalist.

Now, the focus is turning on whether or not the UK will leave without a deal.  Boris Johnson's 'oven-ready' deal seems suddenly to be half-baked.  It always was.  Furthermore, Boris doesn't really understand it himself - another reason to avoid forensic scrutiny.

Focus on a trade deal with the EU, now reminds voters that Brexit won't be done that easily.  What kind of relationship do we want with the EU?

Businesses will want one a similar to the one we currently have.  Much of our manufacturing output depends on supply chains in the EU.  For these to suddenly add cost to production would affect their competitiveness, and ultimately put jobs at risk.

Brexit isn't 'oven-ready'.  Britain certainly isn't ready.

This is why Corbyn's position looks increasingly credible.  To renegotiate a customs union and access to the single market, and then to put such a deal back to the people.

Corbyn has faced the media.  Boris has ducked it.   Corbyn's interviews have been challenging and difficult, but he presented himself well.   Boris has failed to show.

Voters should take account of that when it comes to the question of who they trust.

Comments

Popular Posts